Category: human rights

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Malcolm X with his wife, Betty Shabazz, and their children during a meeting at the headquarters of his Organization of Afro-American Unity at Hotel Theresa in Harlem on February 20, 1965.

Malcolm is holding his daughter Qubilah. He was assassinated the next day at the Audubon Ballroom in front of his wife and children.

(Photos by Duilio Pallottelli)

Muhammad Ali with his mentor

Malcolm X at the United Nations headquarters in New York City, 1964.

Malcolm arranged for Ali (then Cassius X) to meet with diplomats from Africa and Asia at the United Nations. Sports writer Murray Robinson noted in the New York Journal American that Malcolm intended to “make the heavyweight champion an international political figure.”

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“When I am dead–I say it that way because from the things I know, I do not expect to live long enough to read this book in its finished form–I want you to just watch and see if I’m not right in what I say: that the white man, in his press, is going to identify me with “hate”. He will make use of me dead, as he has made use of me alive, as a convenient symbol, of “hatred”–and that will help him escape facing the truth that all I have been doing is holding up a mirror to reflect, to show, the history of unspeakable crimes that his race has committed against my race.” 

― Malcolm X (The Autobiography of Malcolm X)

Happy Birthday Malcolm X! 

May 19, 1925 – February 21, 1965

“They called me ‘the angriest Negro in America.’ I wouldn’t deny that charge. I spoke exactly as I felt. ‘I believe in anger. The Bible says there is a time for anger.’ They called me ‘a teacher, a fomentor of violence.’ I would say point blank, That is a lie. I’m not for wanton violence, I’m for justice. I feel that if white people were attacked by Negroes –

if the forces of law prove unable, or inadequate, or reluctant to protect those whites from those Negroes

then those white people should protect and defend themselves from those Negroes, using arms if necessary. And I feel that when the law fails to protect Negroes from whites’ attack, then those Negroes should use arms, if necessary, to defend themselves.“

(Photos by John Launois, 1964) 

Malcolm X photographed by John Launois in Cairo, August 1964.

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Malcolm X photographed by Gordon Parks for

LIFE magazine promoting the Muhammad Speaks newspaper, 1962.

On the night of April 27, 1962, scores of policemen ransacked the Nation of Islam Mosque in Los Angeles and wounded seven unarmed Muslims, leaving Ronald Stokes dead and William Rogers who is seen in the wheelchair above paralyzed.

Malcolm X photographed by John Launois in Cairo, August 1964.

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Malcolm X photographed by John Launois in Egypt, August 1964.

Malcolm X in Rochester, New York on February 16, 1965.

In Rochester,

Malcolm met with the Commission on the Negro and Theological Education, a student and faculty group at Colgate Divinity School. He then held a press conference at the Manger Hotel where he discussed the Civil Rights Movement, his split with the Nation of Islam and expressed his hopes to achieve “a society in which everyone can live as human beings.” In the evening he spoke at the Corn Hill Methodist Episcopal Church on Edinburgh Street. Standing in front of a packed house of black and white audience members, he delivered a speech entitled “Not just an American problem, but a World Problem.” He touched on a variety of topics including Rochester’s recent race riots and the mass media’s depiction of African Americans, but above all emphasized the need to re-conceptualize the American civil rights movement as part of a global struggle. Malcolm’s lecture in Rochester would be the last public speech he gave,

he was assassinated

five days later on February 21, 1965.

Malcolm X at London Airport on February 9, 1965.